Tag: Locke

10 Losties We Love: A look back at our favorite “Lost” characters

In what could easily be billed as the biggest television event of the decade, ABC’s “Lost” will shut the hatch door on six years of mind-bending mystery when it caps off its incredible run with a two-and-a-half hour series finale on May 23. When it debuted back in 2004, no one could have anticipated that J.J. Abrams’ island drama would depend so much on its cool plot devices and mysteries, but the show remains first and foremost about the characters. With so many great personalities populating the “Lost” universe, it’s difficult to settle on a list of the absolute best, but that doesn’t mean we didn’t try. The Bullz-Eye staff recently sat down to compile a list of our personal favorites, as well as a few we didn’t like so much. Check out some samples below:

James “Sawyer” Ford

He’s a con-man, a killer, and can’t remember anyone’s name to save his life, but for some reason, we just can’t help having a fondness for the man we’ve come to know as Sawyer. Admittedly, part of it has to do with all the great nicknames he’s come up with for his fellow survivors – just the monikers he’s saddled Hurley with (Pillsbury, Rerun, Grape Ape, Mongo, Jabba, Deep Dish to cite a few) are enough to make him our hero – but it’s mostly because of the fact that, for all of the flashbacks we’ve seen on “Lost,” few have found us changing our tune about a character quite as much as his. We learned that, at the ripe old age of eight, his parents were conned so profoundly by a man using the alias of Tom Sawyer that his father killed his mother, then himself, damaging the boy’s psyche so much that he took on the con man’s last name and profession. Sawyer was a far cry from a good man before taking Oceanic Flight 815, and he wasn’t all that nice a guy immediately thereafter, either (remember the way he hoarded the whiskey and porn that he’d found in the wreckage?), but thanks to his relationships with Kate and Juliet, along with various sacrifices he’s made over the course of six seasons, we’ve seen that there really is a good heart beating beneath that snippy, cynical exterior.

Michael Dawson

Unlike many of his fellow castaways, Michael Dawson’s departure from the show didn’t result in a gasp, but a sigh of relief. By far one of the most annoying characters to ever wash up on the island, Michael also had one of the least interesting back stories of the original group. Though many parents might applaud his protective instincts (particularly considering he didn’t have much of a relationship with Walt prior to the crash), that doesn’t change the fact that he killed two innocents (Ana Lucia and Libby) and then backstabbed four others simply so that he could get himself and his son off the island. But just when it looked like we were free for good of his incessant whining, Michael returned by way of the freighter (now under the orders of Ben Linus, who else?) with the hope of redeeming himself by saving his fellow Losties from impending danger. His sacrificial suicide didn’t quite have the intended effect, however, as no one really cared what happened to him by that point. In the end, he was relegated to a ghostly whisper in the island’s jungle, and considering just how forgettable his character was, it was exactly what he deserved.

Be sure to read the complete feature over at Bullz-Eye, and then browse additional content by visiting our new Lost Fan Hub for interviews, DVD reviews, and much more.

Lost 5.3 – Jughead

Last week’s season premiere was one of the most complicated episodes that “Lost” has ever produced, so it was sort of nice to just sit back and take it easy for once without having to think too much. Of course, though a lot didn’t really happen plot-wise tonight (the Islanders were nearly killed only to be whisked away to safety by the white light), we did learn quite a few interesting things along the way.

For starters, Faraday’s Oxford experiments were being completely funded by Charles Widmore. That probably isn’t as much of a surprise as it was meant it to be, since it was Faraday who volunteered to join Widmore’s future expedition, but Desmond was plenty intrigued. Then again, Charles Widmore is right up there with Satan on his list of the World’s Evilest Beings, so I’m not exactly sure what to think of his reaction. My first thought was that Desmond was mad at himself for not making the connection earlier (I mean, of course Widmore would be responsible for funding something like that), but it also looked like he might have gained a little compassion for the guy when he discovered that he was helping to keep one of Faraday’s comatose lab rats alive. Then again, maybe not, because he burst into Widmore’s office and demanded information about Faraday’s mother without as much as an “Oh yeah, and Penny just gave birth to our son, and we named him after Charlie, brother!”

Lost 5.3

And while I’m on the subject of Faraday, does anyone else find it curious that he’s gone from timid physicist to team leader in a matter of days? I don’t want to complain too much, because he’s my favorite character on the show, but it just seems odd that someone so twitchy could become so confident all of a sudden. Nevertheless, after evading a mine field (did anyone else yell “holy shit” when those two red shirts went flying?) and being captured by the Others, Faraday took control of the situation by admitting (read: lying) to Richard Alpert that they’re part of a military invasion. Clearly, Alpert isn’t as smart as he seems, because as one of the Others so bluntly pointed out, there’s no way that Faraday, a British girl and a Chinese guy are members of the U.S. Army; at least, not in 1954.

I’ll be curious to see what more is made of this development in the coming weeks, because with the exception of the dead U.S. soldiers that Miles “heard” and the giant Hydrogen bomb that’s sitting in the middle of the island, there doesn’t seem to be much of a connection to the rest of the mysteries. There is, however, a possible connection to Faraday himself, and it’s the Other named Ellie. Not only does he mention that she looks familiar, but the rat in Faraday’s time travel experiment was named Eloise. Coincidence? I think not. Furthermore, Fionnula Flanagan’s character, the one working with Ben to help the Oceanic 6 get back to the island, is credited as Eloise Hawking. Could Ellie be Faraday’s mother, and if so, how will she factor into the story?

It’s anyone’s guess at this time (heck, Flanagan’s character hasn’t even been formally introduced), and I’m not going to worry about it when there’s far juicier stuff to discuss like, oh I dunno, that Charles Widmore used to be an Other! Go ahead and mark that up as most surprising reveal of the night, because while I knew that that smartass kid had to be someone important, I never imagined it would be Widmore. It makes total sense, though, because how else would he know about the island? Why he left and wanted to come back, however, is a completely different matter, but he clearly still has a few things to learn in the meantime. “What, you think he can track me? You think he knows this island better than I do?” Um, yeah, it’s John Locke, dude. That’s a guy you definitely don’t want to mess with, even if he’s kinda, sorta already dead.

© 2021 Premium Hollywood

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑