Tag: Jeremy Davies

Lost: Season Six – A Preview to the Beginning of the End

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Just as it became a pop culture phenomenon during its first season, “Lost” will once again be on everyone’s radar as the island drama builds toward its inevitable end with the Season 6 premiere on February 2nd. Though Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof have done an incredible job over the years of juggling all the different storylines and mysteries, it’s asking a lot to think that they’ll be able to end the show without criticism from some of its fans. With that said, however, I cannot wait to see what they’ve cooked up for the show’s sixth season, because after last year’s head-scratcher of a finale, there’s plenty at stake.

The biggest question of all revolves around Jughead. Did Juliet succeed in detonating the hydrogen bomb, and if so, will it really reset time like Faraday led Jack to believe? Early indicators certainly point to that being the case, with several former cast members returning for an unspecified amount of episodes. This includes everyone from minor players like Charlotte (Rebecca Mader), Libby (Cynthia Watros) and Boone (Ian Somerhalder), to more influential characters like Faraday (Jeremy Davies), Juliet (Elizabeth Mitchell), Michael (Harold Perrineau) and, of course, Charlie (Dominic Monaghan). No word yet on whether Mr. Eko, Ana-Lucia, Shannon or Walt will also find their way back into the “Lost” universe, but rumor is that Cuse and Lindelof are bringing back everyone they possibly can, and that extends to many of the supporting characters as well.

Of course, there’s also a chance that Juliet hasn’t changed the past, but merely created an alternate reality that branches off the one we know. Don’t forget, “whatever happened, happened,” so no matter what may have sprouted as a result of Jughead’s detonation, that particular timeline will always exist. Granted, even if we are treated to a look at how the survivors’ lives would have turned out if Oceanic Flight 815 never crashed, you can be sure that we’ll still be seeing plenty of the island throughout the season. There’s no way the Losties are done just yet, because there are still a number of questions left unanswered, such as…

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Lost 5.5 – This Island Is Death

In the mid-’90s, my then-girlfriend watched “Melrose Place” religiously. I wasn’t opposed to the show itself – any show with Heather Locklear is worth at least a look with the sound off, right? – but every time Marcia Cross came onscreen, I would repeat my mantra: “Would someone please KILL HER?” They would even tease us with promos saying, “One of these characters will die,” then show shots of all the leads and one blatant Red Shirt character. It made me crazy that these people would knock on Death’s door and ask him to punch them in the face, but they survived everything, like a bunch of bed-hopping cockroaches. For years, I would think that TV shows didn’t have the balls to kill their characters. It would be too risky, too polarizing.

Man, karma’s a bitch. This week alone, Daphne bites it on “Heroes,” and now Charlotte succumbs to Time Jumping Syndrome. TV finally gave me everything I ever wanted. It wasn’t what I wanted. Come on, they couldn’t have killed the cheerleader and Juliet instead?

Ben Linus might be the most conniving bag of douche on God’s green earth, but you have to admire how unflappable he is. He never loses his cool or panics even when someone has a gun to his head, and that happens a lot. This time it was Sun that was looking for a little payback, though one thing about her arc bugs me: she gets the gun through covert means, and is flipping through a file with shots of Jack and Ben before meeting them at the pier. At first, it looked as though she was on assignment, and Ben was the target. Is she a contract killer, or did she merely pull a few of Daddy’s strings to acquire some heat and settle a score?

“You go ahead, Sawyer. I’m going to watch the love of my life regress to her childhood self and die, but not before scaring the living shit out of me.”

The bits between Rousseau and Jin were interesting, though much like everything else about “Lost,” they ask more questions than they answer. Her entire group goes to save their leader after the smoke monster drags him below (though not before he loses an arm, yikes). Then Jin jumps forward a little bit, and the rest of her group is now “infected,” though with what we’re not sure. She even thinks Jin is infected too, and since the father of Rousseau’s baby just tried to shoot her, I can’t say I blame her for being a little paranoid. Still, I hope they shed more light on what happened to them in the “temple.” I’d also love to know how Ben came to be Alexandra’s “father.”

And while we’re talking about graphic violence, did anyone else wince at the sight of Locke’s leg after he fell down the well? Compound fractures are right up there with severed Achilles tendons on the list of things that make me go “Aieeeeeeeee!” I thought it was amusing that Jack’s father is now Jacob’s official spokesperson. I’m sure there’s some cosmic significance to that – though my first thought when I saw him was “Help Locke, dude, you’re a doctor!” – but we’re probably a year away from any explanation.

And let us not forget the episode’s Big Reveal, when Charlotte told Daniel that she used to live on the island as a little girl, and that a scary old man once told her that she would die here…and that the old man was Daniel, dunt dunt duuuuuuunh. Daniel didn’t know this, which means it hasn’t happened to him yet. Does it happen soon, or years from now? How much time do Sawyer, Juliet and Miles have before they die, too? And how heartbreaking was it to watch Charlotte’s mind come undone? Also, is it just me, or does Jeremy Davies have the most expressive eyebrows of any actor working today?

Jason will be back to blog next week, so thanks for allowing me to sub in for him this week, and I hope I didn’t completely screw the pooch.

Lost 5.3 – Jughead

Last week’s season premiere was one of the most complicated episodes that “Lost” has ever produced, so it was sort of nice to just sit back and take it easy for once without having to think too much. Of course, though a lot didn’t really happen plot-wise tonight (the Islanders were nearly killed only to be whisked away to safety by the white light), we did learn quite a few interesting things along the way.

For starters, Faraday’s Oxford experiments were being completely funded by Charles Widmore. That probably isn’t as much of a surprise as it was meant it to be, since it was Faraday who volunteered to join Widmore’s future expedition, but Desmond was plenty intrigued. Then again, Charles Widmore is right up there with Satan on his list of the World’s Evilest Beings, so I’m not exactly sure what to think of his reaction. My first thought was that Desmond was mad at himself for not making the connection earlier (I mean, of course Widmore would be responsible for funding something like that), but it also looked like he might have gained a little compassion for the guy when he discovered that he was helping to keep one of Faraday’s comatose lab rats alive. Then again, maybe not, because he burst into Widmore’s office and demanded information about Faraday’s mother without as much as an “Oh yeah, and Penny just gave birth to our son, and we named him after Charlie, brother!”

Lost 5.3

And while I’m on the subject of Faraday, does anyone else find it curious that he’s gone from timid physicist to team leader in a matter of days? I don’t want to complain too much, because he’s my favorite character on the show, but it just seems odd that someone so twitchy could become so confident all of a sudden. Nevertheless, after evading a mine field (did anyone else yell “holy shit” when those two red shirts went flying?) and being captured by the Others, Faraday took control of the situation by admitting (read: lying) to Richard Alpert that they’re part of a military invasion. Clearly, Alpert isn’t as smart as he seems, because as one of the Others so bluntly pointed out, there’s no way that Faraday, a British girl and a Chinese guy are members of the U.S. Army; at least, not in 1954.

I’ll be curious to see what more is made of this development in the coming weeks, because with the exception of the dead U.S. soldiers that Miles “heard” and the giant Hydrogen bomb that’s sitting in the middle of the island, there doesn’t seem to be much of a connection to the rest of the mysteries. There is, however, a possible connection to Faraday himself, and it’s the Other named Ellie. Not only does he mention that she looks familiar, but the rat in Faraday’s time travel experiment was named Eloise. Coincidence? I think not. Furthermore, Fionnula Flanagan’s character, the one working with Ben to help the Oceanic 6 get back to the island, is credited as Eloise Hawking. Could Ellie be Faraday’s mother, and if so, how will she factor into the story?

It’s anyone’s guess at this time (heck, Flanagan’s character hasn’t even been formally introduced), and I’m not going to worry about it when there’s far juicier stuff to discuss like, oh I dunno, that Charles Widmore used to be an Other! Go ahead and mark that up as most surprising reveal of the night, because while I knew that that smartass kid had to be someone important, I never imagined it would be Widmore. It makes total sense, though, because how else would he know about the island? Why he left and wanted to come back, however, is a completely different matter, but he clearly still has a few things to learn in the meantime. “What, you think he can track me? You think he knows this island better than I do?” Um, yeah, it’s John Locke, dude. That’s a guy you definitely don’t want to mess with, even if he’s kinda, sorta already dead.

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