(500) days of Spidey news?; all together now in the uncanny valley…and a whole lot more

Yes, we ‘ve got movie news…

Peter Parker/Spiderman
* Nikki Finke’s new best friend, Mike Fleming (or someone, it’s written in the third person), writes tonight that director Marc Webb of the very popular indie relationship comedy, “(500) Days of Summer” is right now the most likely director for the just announced “Spiderman” reboot.  Fleming, or whomever, writes that  Webb has “no superhero experience,” which is not really the issue. The issue is that, while he’s quite capable of making an okay indie comedy (I’m not the movie’s biggest fan), he has no action experience and Sam Raimi had obviously quite a bit before attempting “Spiderman.” Still, the choice of Webb wouldn’t be half so strange as another one mentioned by Fleming (or whomever) apparently in all seriousness: Wes Anderson.

I wish we lived in a universe where studio executives would be so weirdly brave. And, hey, if Anderson’s not available, they could try David Lynch. I don’t know about the masses, but I’d definitely pay to see either movie.

Fleming (or whomever), however, is absolutely correct that, if he were just a bit younger, Joseph Gordon-Levitt would be the guy to play the new Peter Parker. Oh, well.

* Fleming also has it that Daniel Craig is “in talks” to replace a vacating Robert Downey, Jr. on the comic book adaptation, “Cowboys and Aliens.” Interesting transition. Downey seems more alien than cowboy; Craig is definitely more cowboy than alien.

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The 10 Worst Comic Book Movies

King-Mag.com put together a list of the 10 Worst Comic Book Movies.

Here’s a sampling:

9. Daredevil (2003)
Why’s it so bad? The director of Grumpier Old Men delivers a crash course in miscasting with Colin Farrell chewing the scenery as a cornball assassin and Ben Affleck in a skintight, red leather suit. What could be worse?

Aftermath: A modest hit, Daredevil managed to rake in over $100 million at the box office and gave Affleck his last taste of success before the career-killing streak of Gigli, Paycheck, Jersey Girl and Surviving Christmas. Turns out bad choices hurt him more than the Kingpin ever could.

It’s a pretty solid list, though they sort of throw “The Incredible Hulk” under the bus by mentioning it in the “Hulk” blurb.

Five years later the title relaunched with new stars (Edward Norton and Liv Tyler), a new director (Louis Leterrier) and similar results (disappointing box office, mixed reviews). Let’s hope Marvel doesn’t believe the third time’s a charm.

I didn’t think the first one was all that bad, but there’s no doubt that the second one was better. “The Incredible Hulk” got a 7.3 at IMDB.com, a 67% at Rotten Tomatoes, and according to Box Office Mojo, it made almost $263 million worldwide (on a budget of $150 million). I for one sure hope that they bring back Edward Norton for another chapter.

  

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