It’s time for another end of week movie news dump. Yay.

Yup, with Cannes going on and the early-early summer movie season happening, things are hopping.

* Nikkie Finke broke the news this morning of the latest chapter in the never-ending tale of the battle over the rights to the character of “Superman.” It seems DC is countersuing lawyer Marc Toberoff on the grounds of conflict of interest. Sure does sound like “hardball” but that’s what happens when millions of dollars are at stake.

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* It never ends. It just never, ever ends. A new alleged victim has come forward claiming that Roman Polanski raped her during the eighties when she was sixteen. (The terms used in the article are “sexually abused” in “the worst possible way” — I have no clue how that could not be rape, at the very least, if true). The woman is being represented by, naturally, Gloria Allred.

At this time, there’s no corroborating evidence beyond the charges. If there is, I think it’s curtains for Polanski and he’ll find himself suddenly and justifiably all-but friendless in Hollywood. It’s one thing to have one extremely nasty episode in your past, it’s quite another to be a serial sexual predator.

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“Bone structure”

As I mentioned in my post below, veteran screenwriter Alvin Sargent is said to be hard at work on the latest draft of “Spiderman 4.” Prior to working on “Spiderman 2,” Sargent was best known for his work on more small-scale films from the late sixties, seventies, and eighties including his Oscar-winning work on “Ordinary People” and “Julia.”

Below is an example of Sargent at his tragicomic best from his merely Oscar-nominated screenplay for Peter Bogdanovich’s retro 1973 comedy, “Paper Moon,” based on the novel by Joe David Brown. As Mlle. Trixie Delight, the late, great Madilyn Kahn does all the talking in this scene . She was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her work, but it was Tatum O’Neal who was the youngest person to ever win a competitive Oscar for the role, winning the Best Actress award at age 10.

  

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