Best ever horseracing movies

There have been quite a few racing movies down the years but three stand out as the best ever racing movies for very different reasons:

1. National Velvet – 1944

This is a family tearjerker of a movie about the Grand National held in the UK each year – probably the most famous race over jumps in the world. Filmed in glorious Technicolor at Pebble Beach funnily enough – this was the film that launched the career of young Elizabeth Taylor. It’s a real family favorite and a ripping yarn. Your children will love it!

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The Nifty Fifties DVD Giveaway

The 1950s marked the introduction of cultural and technological changes (i.e. Rock ‘n Roll, TV sets) that reverberated into the themes and acting styles of this era. Many stars made their debut in the ’50s, while others continued their rise in stardom, including Sidney Poitier, Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Charlton Heston, Debbie Reynolds, Robert Wagner, Marilyn Monroe and Gregory Peck. With Mill Creek Entertainment’s “The Nifty Fifties” DVD set, you can enjoy all these stars and more with over 65 hours of movies from the era.

To help get the word out about this release and Mill Creek’s many other Cheap DVD Packs, Premium Hollywood is giving one lucky winner a copy of the “The Nifty Fifties” DVD set. Additionally, we’re offering a 25% discount code that can be used on their official site. Just enter 50PACK25 when checking out before May 31, 2012 to save even more.

Click here to enter for your chance to win, and then be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook for updates on new contests and giveaways.

CONTEST ENDS: May 16th

  

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Red Carpet Chatter: Mike Nichols Gets His AFI Lifetime Achievement Award

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Born in 1931 in what was very soon to become Hitler’s Germany, young Michael Peschkowsky was living in Manhattan by 1939. It was great luck both for the future Mike Nichols and for the country that accepted him.

Nichols is, of course, one of the most respected directors in Hollywood, and for good reason. He’s the original, craftsmanlike, and emotionally astute directorial voice responsible for such sixties and seventies classics as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,”  “Carnal Knowledge” and, of course, “The Graduate” (the source of his only directorial Oscar so far) as well as such eighties, nineties, and oughts successes as “Silkwood,” “Working Girl,” “The Birdcage,” and “Closer.” Even if some of the later films are not on the same level of quality as his earlier films — and several, especially his 1988 box office hit, “Working Girl,” stray into mediocrity — it’s still one of the most impressive and diverse careers of any living director in Hollywood.

That’s just on the big screen. On television, Nichols has rebounded in the eyes of many critics, directing two of the most acclaimed television productions of the last decade, 2001’s “Wit” with Emma Thompson, and the outstanding 2005 miniseries adaptation of Tony Kushner’s brilliant and mammoth epic play, “Angels in America.” With his 80th birthday just a year and a half away, he’s still working hard with two thrillers movies planned, including an I’ll-believe-it-when-I-see-it remake of Akira Kurosawa’s “High and Low” currently being rewritten by the decidedly counter-intuitive choice of Chris Rock.

Before he directed his first foot of film, Mike Nichols was a noted theater director. That in itself is not so unusual a root for directors to travel. What is different is that, before he was a noted theater director, he was half of one of the most influential comedy teams in show business history, Nichols and May. (His comedy partner, Elaine May, went on to become an important, if less commercially successful, writer and director in her own right.)

Still, from the moment he directed his first major play, Neil Simon’s “Barefoot in the Park,” Nichols mostly abandoned performing. Today, his highly regarded early work is mostly known only to fairly hardcore comedy aficionados.

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