Red-band trailer time: “This quest sucks.”

Who thought the director of the diaphanous, neorealist success d’estime “George Washington” would wind up directing an anachronism filled period fantasy spoof/update on the Bob Hope/Bing Crosby “Road” pictures with pot jokes replacing booze jokes?  Nevertheless, that indeed is what David Gordon Green, with screenwriters Danny McBride and Ben Best, appear to have wrought with his follow-up to the funny “Pineapple Express.”

“Your Highness” stars Danny McBride, who I’m not sure I really get as an actor or comedian, but it also also features 2010 Oscar nominees James Franco and Natalie Portman, not to mention the wonderful Zooey Deschanel, who I totally get. If you’re over 18 and your boss or disapproving coworkers aren’t around, take a look.

More Your Highness Videos

Like I said, I’m not yet on board the Danny McBride comedy train. However, after a rocky start, this really made me laugh.

  

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Johnny Mercer: The Dream’s on Me

Though he was a rich man, an underrated singer in his own right, and the co-founder of Capitol Records, Johnny Mercer is, 34 years after his death, nowhere near as famous as the author of such brain-burrowing mid-century lyrics as “One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)”, “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive,” “That Ol’ Black Magic,” “Satin Doll,” “Laura,” and “Moon River” really should be. Lyricists rarely get the respect composers do. Moreover, Mercer worked primarily in Hollywood, which in his day meant more money but less prestige than writing songs for Broadway. That’s show business.

“Johnny Mercer: The Dream’s on Me” suffers slightly from the ill-fitting inclusion of some new material featuring super jazz fan and executive producer Clint Eastwood chatting with film composer John Williams and others, but overall, this TCM documentary written by Ken Barnes and directed by Bruce Ricker is a massively engaging documentary look at Mercer’s often surprising career. The 90-minute film efficiently covers his personal riches-to-(not quite)-rags-to-greater-riches story and tumultuous personal life, including a lifelong affair with Judy Garland, but wisely focuses on the music and takes full advantage of some priceless archival footage. Performances and interviews featuring Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Louis Prima and Keely Smith, Julie Andrews, Blake Edwards, Ray Charles, a young Barbara Streisand, a middle-aged Bono, and new performances by Jamie Cullum, Dr. John and others (seen in their entirety on the DVD bonus disc), beautifully illustrate Mercer’s gifts and chart his extraordinary influence. An obvious labor of love, “The Dream’s On Me” is not exactly great filmmaking but it’s got great taste and is a must for fans of great popular music.

Click to buy “Johnny Mercer: The Dream’s on Me”

  

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