A bit of the OLD ultraviolence

With “Kick-Ass” raising just a little bit of controversy, below are two trailers and a Siskel & Ebert review for the three movies for which the term “ultraviolence” was originally coined, though I suppose author Anthony Burgess might get the credit for the actual words. Though “A Clockwork Orange” and “Bonnie and Clyde” are both obviously more serious films than an action-black-comedy like “Kick-Ass,” its worth noting that, as is the case now, the juxtaposition of violence and humor in those films was a big part of what so disturbed some critics. As for “The Wild Bunch,” it was just the sheer savagery of the thing.

<object width=”425″ height=”344″><param name=”movie” value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/5n2NXuQ5ako&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x3a3a3a&color2=0x999999″></param><param name=”allowFullScreen” value=”true”></param><param name=”allowscriptaccess” value=”always”></param><embed src=”http://www.youtube.com/v/5n2NXuQ5ako&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x3a3a3a&color2=0x999999″ type=”application/x-shockwave-flash” allowscriptaccess=”always” allowfullscreen=”true” width=”425″ height=”344″></embed></object>

Given his review of “Kick-Ass,” I think Roger Ebert’s remark about the children in “The Wild Bunch” is worth noting. I’ll be discussing that some more shortly.

  

You can follow us on Twitter @moviebuffs and on Facebook as well.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>